Blog

Archive for the ‘Archives’ Category

Blue Earth Prize At The PhotoAlliance 2012 Our World Portfolio Review

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Blue Earth Prize For Best Project Photography at the PhotoAlliance 2012 Our World Portfolio Review

We are pleased to invite applicants for the Blue Earth Prize For Best Project Photography at the PhotoAlliance 2012 Our World Portfolio Review. This award offered in partnership with PhotoAlliance provides recognition for photographic work best representing our mission: To raise awareness about endangered cultures, threatened environments and social concerns through photography.

This award will highlight the work of one attendee in a special Honors section of the Blue Earth website. Blue Earth will also waive the application fee for the winning photographer to submit for Blue Earth project sponsorship as well as offer free membership for one year. Up to three runners-up will also be offered free submission for Project Sponsorship and a free one-year Blue Earth membership.

PhotoAlliance 2012 Our World Portfolio Review
Addressing the Creative Ways We Explore, Portray, Express and
Connect Through Images.

March 9-11, 2012 in San Francisco
To guarantee a high quality experience, the event will be pre-juried. Deadline to submit your portfolio for consideration February 10th, 2012. For questions contact thom@photoalliance.org.

Reviewers are committed professionals representing a cross section of our community including book and magazine publishers, packagers and editors, museum, non-profit and commercial gallery directors, curators and leading educators and photographers.

Archive Highlight: The Grandmother Spirit

Friday, May 27th, 2011

Flory Kolobe, surrounded by some of the 80 orphans in her program. Tsepong Councelling Centre was established in 2001 to  Raise HIV/ aids awareness in rural and urban areas. To provide counselling services, HIV testing at the Senkatana Clinic Centre.  To support identified orphan and vulnerable children . Since 2002 they have been taking care of double orphans from five areas in and around Maseru. © Steve Simon

Flory Kolobe, surrounded by some of the 80 orphans in her program. Tsepong Counseling Centre was established in 2001 to raise HIV/ aids awareness in rural and urban areas. To provide counseling services, HIV testing at the Senkatana Clinic Centre.  To support identified orphan and vulnerable children. Since 2002 they have been taking care of double orphans from five areas in and around Maseru. © Steve Simon

 

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 30 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.  This week we are pleased to highlight Steve Simon’s The Grandmother Spirit.

The idea of this project is to illuminate the determination, strength, resiliency, and inspiration of The African Grandmother: the heart, soul and hands of response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic there.

Revealing documentary moments of daily life, still lives, extreme close-ups, and landscapes will be integrated with portraits; strong, direct, with simple backdrop or background. These high resolution portraits will be displayed large, insuring these beautiful, quiet people who often go unnoticed will be seen.

The Grandmother Spirit will capture the universal, inexorable human connection between the Grandmothers and the orphans they are raising.

“We almost never think of the grandmothers, except in passing. Yet they are emerging as the unheralded heroes of the continent. They’re poor, they’re old; they live with the inconsolable anguish of having buried their own adult children. They’re tired, they’re hungry, and yet they’re fast becoming the true, resilient, magnificent hearts of the struggle of the continent.” - Stephen Lewis, United Nations Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa

Visit Simon’s project gallery for more photos.

- Bart J. Cannon, Executive Director

Constantine In The Amnesty International Media Awards

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Exiled To Nowhere

Exiled To Nowhere - Discriminatory citizenship laws imposed by the Burmese government have systematically stripped over one million Rohingya in the Rakhine state of western Burma of their citizenship. Blind in one eye after being beaten in the head during forced labor, the man fled from Burma in the mid 1990’s and is one of an estimated 100,000 stateless Rohingya now living in the southern part of neighboring Bangladesh. © Greg Constantine

It has been another busy year for Blue Earth project photographer Greg Constantine traveling to continue work on his project Nowhere People, documenting the daily lives of persons coping with statelessness across the globe.  His most recent exhibit “Kenya’s Nubians: Then Now,” which was shown at HOST Gallery in London and at The Go Down Arts Centre in Nairobi, has just been shortlisted in the Photojournalism category of the Amnesty International Media Awards in the UK.

Our congratulations to Greg! In case you missed it earlier, read Greg’s latest report from the field.

- Bart J. Cannon, Executive Director

Archive Highlight: FEAR - A Project on Rape and Recovery

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

© Tim Matsui

© Tim Matsui

Blue Earth currently sponsors over 25 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.  This week we are pleased to highlight Tim Matsui’s FEAR: A Project on Rape and Recovery.

FEAR is a documentary project combining both photo and radio journalism in a video production to tell personal stories of sexual violence. Not simply an exercise in rape recollection, FEAR documents real people coping with the lasting effects of sexual assault.

Each story is a stand-alone ‘chapter’ intended as part of an overarching production for the editorial and advocacy markets. Two chapters are currently being distributed to colleges, schools, and clinics by Intermedia, Inc., an educational media company. In these stories we can find our relationship to the violence and hopefully make sense of it.

FEAR’s goals are to increase dialog about sexual violence and its prevention, to help build a community less likely to commit acts of sexual violence, and to help build a community more supportive of survivors of sexual violence.

Visit his project gallery for more photos.

- Bart J. Cannon, Executive Director

Archive Highlight: Incan Plants Today

Wednesday, September 8th, 2010

© Martin Lopo

© Martin Lopo

 

Blue Earth currently sponsors over 25 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

Photographer Lorena Guillen Vaschetti and anthropologist Martin Lopo’s Incan Plants Today is a record of Incan healing and cultural traditions, practiced by fewer and fewer as the years pass. The project documents Incan healing techniques that use the curative properties of native crops in the fertile Sacred Valley of Peru as it explores the cultural reservoir of the modern Peruvian people and the value of natural medicines and cooperative markets in the region.

Through their project, Vaschetti and Lopo have helped to sustain everyday healing practices while recovering ancient knowledge and cultural values. Self-sufficiency forms the cultural reservoir for Peruvian’s values of respect for nature, cooperative action, and reciprocity to the Pacha Mama, or Mother Earth.

- Bart J. Cannon, Executive Director

Archive Highlight: Healing Planet

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

Namaste © Marie-Rose Phan-Lê

Namaste © Marie-Rose Phan-Lê

Blue Earth currently sponsors over 20 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

Traditional healing methods are becoming a lost art due to global modernization, cultural assimilation, and habitat destruction.  In many cultures, the healer is the vehicle through which medicine travels to the people.  Healing traditions, which were once transmitted from one generation to the next, are now near extinction as many healers are aging without apprentices to replace them.

Ultimately created to air as a six episode TV documentary, Marie-Rose Phan-Lê’s project Healing Planet explores the lives, rituals, and wisdom of traditional healers around the world.  The documentary follows Phan-Lê, an apprentice healer herself, as she learns from the elders of many varied cultures.  Through her journey, the audience is transported into a world of exotic places, esoteric practices, and practical applications in the art of healing.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager

Archive Highlight: Aftermath

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010

© Sara Terry

© Sara Terry

 

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 20 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

This week we are highlighting Sara Terry’s Aftermath.  The media cover war, but rarely the aftermath—the challenging time when people rebuild communities, rekindle hope, and learn to live again.  Since 2000, Sara Terry has been chronicling Bosnia’s struggle to rebuild following a vicious war marked by ethnic cleansing and genocide.  Aftermath shows us that the strength of the human spirit is tested not only on the battlefield, but in the wake of war as well.  Terry has documented the exhumation and identification of victims of ethnic cleansing, the postwar lives of widows and children, the continued existence of hard-line communities, and the return of refugees.  Terry feels that without an understanding of life after the guns and bombs have stopped, we can only have a naïve grasp on the impact of war.

Terry recently released a book, Aftermath, to critical acclaim, and formed a nonprofit organization The Aftermath Project to assist others working in postwar zones.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager

Archive Highlight: Nature Vs. Man in the Great Northwest

Friday, April 30th, 2010

© Wes Pope

© Wes Pope

 

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 30 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

This week we are highlighting Wes Pope’s Nature Versus Man in the Great Northwest.  Wes Pope’s Nature Versus Man in the Great Northwest is an ironic and humorous look at the ways in which man uses and abuses the forests, rivers, and wildlife that make up the Northwest ecosystem.  For this project, Pope used a pinhole camera—made out of recycled film boxes and latte cups—which provided long exposure times, making people look like ghosts while damage to the landscape appears clear and sharp—“a bit like seeing the world on nature’s time scale.”  Local insight and editorial perspective offer a firsthand glimpse into the impact of growth in the Northwest.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager

Archive Highlight: Art Wolfe’s “The Living Wild”

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

Humpback Whale, Tonga, South Pacific  © Art Wolfe

Humpback Whale, Tonga, South Pacific  © Art Wolfe

 

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 30 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

This week we are highlighting a project by local Seattle photographer Art Wolfe, someone who arguably needs little introduction.  His project The Living Wild, producing the best-selling book of the same title, was a product of three years working in the field photographing wildlife in virtually every corner of the globe.  Art is well-known for his for his PBS series Travels to the Edge as well as for his long career as a conservation advocate.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager

Archive Highlight: Animists - The Spirit of Place

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

Abi Gul 7, Rumbur Valley, Pakistan.  Abi Gul's father spent eleven years fighting in the Pakistan courts to keep the Kalash valleys from being logged.  For the Kalash, who have animist cosmology, trees are very sacred.  Three years ago Abi Gul's father was killed by a bomb that was thrown into their little two-room home.  Her uncle continued the court case and finally won the judgement.  Abi Gul was very serious and quiet.  Very dillegent, she stayed by my side and assisted me as I photographed her friends and relatives in her small village.  © Phil Borges

Abi Gul 7, Rumbur Valley, Pakistan.  Abi Gul’s father spent eleven years fighting in the Pakistan courts to keep the Kalash valleys from being logged.  For the Kalash, who have animist cosmology, trees are very sacred.  Three years ago Abi Gul’s father was killed by a bomb that was thrown into their little two-room home.  Her uncle continued the court case and finally won the judgement.  Abi Gul was very serious and quiet.  Very diligent, she stayed by my side and assisted me as I photographed her friends and relatives in her small village.  © Phil Borges

 

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 30 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

This week we are highlighting a project by Blue Earth co-found Phil Borges Animists: The Spirit of Place.  His project documents the few remaining traditional cultures where people spiritually communicate with their environment.  Today, we call these people “animists”: those who believe that the natural world is inhabited by spirits who nurture or destroy in accordance to the respect they are shown.  Borges’s project includes images from Siberia, Mongolia, the Philippines, Ecuador, Africa, and the Amazon basin.  It has been exhibited worldwide and published as a book under the same title.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager

Archive Highlight: Palestinian Portrait

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

A young boy stands next to a mural of a Palestinian rock thrower that was shot and killed at a clash site in Gaza. © Ron Wurzer

A young boy stands next to a mural of a Palestinian rock thrower that was shot and killed at a clash site in Gaza. © Ron Wurzer

 

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 30 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

This week we’re highlighting Ron Wurzer’s Palestinian Portrait.  His project documents the Israeli-Palestinian conflict post-9/11.  Wurzer’s aim was to help Westerners better understand the social climate in the region.  It documents the lives of ordinary Palestinians as they go to school, to work, navigate Israeli roadblocks, endure power outages, live in refugee camps in proximity to Jewish settlers, and deal with an increasingly violent situation and faltering economy.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager

Archive Highlight: The Canari Of Southern Ecuador

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

Three women at Fiesta.  © Judy Blankenship

Three women at Fiesta. © Judy Blankenship

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 30 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own.  But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

This week, I’d like to highlight Judy Blankenship’s project on The Canari Of Southern Ecuador.  Her project emerged as the result of many trips to the region documenting indigenous culture and resulted in a book, Canar: A Year in the Highlands of Ecuador that was published in 2005.  She has gone on to work with the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager

Archive Highlight: David Maisel’s Black Maps

Friday, January 2nd, 2009

An aerial view of the Owens Valley from David Maisel’s “The Lake Project.” © David Maisel

Blue Earth currently sponsors about 30 photographic projects.  Over the years, different projects have run their course and moved forward on their own. But that doesn’t mean they are any less important today than they were when Blue Earth first sponsored them.

Today I’d like to dip into our archives and highlight work from David Maisel’s project Black Maps. Often abstract in appearance, Maisel’s photos of regions suffering from environmental degradation are powerful statements. They speak directly and give first-hand evidence of the damage humanity can inflict on an entire region.

It is easy sometimes to overlook the scope of the damage directly in front of us - Maisel changes the scale.

- Bart J. Cannon, Program Manager