Energy and Ecology

Photographer

Garth Lenz

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Concept

Garth’s project with Blue Earth continues his work on the threat presented by unsustainable energy development, particularly unconventional fossil fuels. This work comprises both the photographic documentation of these issues, as well as the effective outreach needed to ensure that the resulting images make a positive contribution. He will be returning this fall to the Alberta Tar Sands to create new work as well as to give a tour of the area to environmental journalists. He will also be touring and photographing the shale gas region of northeastern B.C. on the same trip.

Biography

Garth is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers.

Garth was recently awarded second and third prize in the photojournalism /environment category of the Pris de la Photographie Paris -PX3- competition.

At the International Photography Awards, Garth was recently awarded first prize in the  Nature/Trees category, as well as third prize in the Nature/Landscape category.

His work on the Alberta Tar Sands and boreal region of Canada was awarded first place in Social Documentary Net's competion, "Ten Years After Nine-Eleven: Searching for a 21st Century Landscape." A selection of this work is currently be shown at the PowerHouse Arena in New York and will soon be appearing in Aperture Foundation's, "Searching For A New Front Page," also in New York. Garth's large solo touring exhibition oif this material was premiered at the G2 Gallery in Los Angeles in February and March of 2011.

Garth’s photography of environmental issues, threatened wilderness regions, devastation, and the impacts on indigenous peoples, has appeared in many of the World’s leading publications. These include Time, The Christian Science Monitor, the Guardian Sunday edition and Guardian Weekly, the New York Times Sunday Edition, International Wildlife, B.B.C Wildlife Magazine, Canadian Geographic, The Globe and Mail, The Tokyo Times, Sierra Magazine, The Nature Conservancy Magazine, and many others.

His work has been used by leading Non Governmental Agencies in full page ads in the New York Times, Conde Nast, The New Yorker, Travel and Leisure, and on billboards throughout the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Germany, as well as in numerous posters and reports.

Garth has made many international presentations on environmental and indigenous rights issues. He has addressed the European Parliament, Canadian Senate, major corporations and business leaders, and given public slideshow tours throughout Canada, the U.S., Europe, and Japan.

www.garthlenz.com

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Featured Projects



Lágrimas do Rio Doce
Tears of the Sweet River


Photographer: Leonardo Merçon

The project Lágrimas do Rio Doce (Translation: Tears of the Sweet River) is an independent photographic-audiovisual production aiming to show the real consequences of this tragedy for biodiversity, local populations and traditional communities that depend on the river to survive. The river is rooted in the culture of fishermen, native americans (índios) and riverside populations. Through this project, these communities will be given a voice.


Water


Photographer: Mustafah Abdulaziz

Initiated in 2011, “Water” is a fifteen-year photographic project. Water and humanity are moving towards a crisis. We live in a time when 650 million people have no access to safe drinking water; when our rivers, basins and lakes are affected by decades of industry; when rising sea levels are placing Pacific Islanders in the cross-hairs of becoming the first climate refugees. The complexity of our relationship with water reflects our greater behavior towards our environment, which we’re beginning to understand has a defining impact on our planet.


Breaking the Cycle
a documentary film


Photographer: Dan Lamont and Sara Finkelstein

The facts are startling: the United States incarcerates more of its citizens than any other country on Earth. Those who fill the jails often come from fractured families with pernicious, multigenerational histories of poverty, substance abuse, mental illness, and domestic violence. Kids from such environments too often get in trouble. Incarcerated youth have a 75 percent chance of reoffending as adults and the cycle continues. It is a terrible tragedy and a colossal waste of human lives and social resources.