Energy and Ecology

Photographer

Garth Lenz

Concept

Garth’s project with Blue Earth continues his work on the threat presented by unsustainable energy development, particularly unconventional fossil fuels. This work comprises both the photographic documentation of these issues, as well as the effective outreach needed to ensure that the resulting images make a positive contribution. He will be returning this fall to the Alberta Tar Sands to create new work as well as to give a tour of the area to environmental journalists. He will also be touring and photographing the shale gas region of northeastern B.C. on the same trip.

Biography

Garth is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers.

Garth was recently awarded second and third prize in the photojournalism /environment category of the Pris de la Photographie Paris -PX3- competition.

At the International Photography Awards, Garth was recently awarded first prize in the  Nature/Trees category, as well as third prize in the Nature/Landscape category.

His work on the Alberta Tar Sands and boreal region of Canada was awarded first place in Social Documentary Net's competion, "Ten Years After Nine-Eleven: Searching for a 21st Century Landscape." A selection of this work is currently be shown at the PowerHouse Arena in New York and will soon be appearing in Aperture Foundation's, "Searching For A New Front Page," also in New York. Garth's large solo touring exhibition oif this material was premiered at the G2 Gallery in Los Angeles in February and March of 2011.

Garth’s photography of environmental issues, threatened wilderness regions, devastation, and the impacts on indigenous peoples, has appeared in many of the World’s leading publications. These include Time, The Christian Science Monitor, the Guardian Sunday edition and Guardian Weekly, the New York Times Sunday Edition, International Wildlife, B.B.C Wildlife Magazine, Canadian Geographic, The Globe and Mail, The Tokyo Times, Sierra Magazine, The Nature Conservancy Magazine, and many others.

His work has been used by leading Non Governmental Agencies in full page ads in the New York Times, Conde Nast, The New Yorker, Travel and Leisure, and on billboards throughout the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Germany, as well as in numerous posters and reports.

Garth has made many international presentations on environmental and indigenous rights issues. He has addressed the European Parliament, Canadian Senate, major corporations and business leaders, and given public slideshow tours throughout Canada, the U.S., Europe, and Japan.

www.garthlenz.com

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Featured Projects



Ross Island and the Future of the McMurdo Sound Region


Photographer: Alasdair Turner

We have entered a time when places the least near us beckon us to understand them, to feel them so that while we tred on our part of the Earth they are constantly with us and with our choices. Ross Island and the McMurdo Sound Region and the science being conducted there embody what is left of our critical and fragile ecosystems and our attempts to understand them. They are not land for a nation but a place for the world. This project is intended to emotionally and scientifically engage citizens of every nation about why this place and the incredible science that is being conducted there matters. It will give life to and investigate the science of the region from the earliest expeditions to today’s ongoing research.


Between River and Sea


Photographer: Michael Hanson

Between River and Sea focuses on life in and around Apalachicola, FL. For over a century, an independent, hand-built industry has drifted through the shallow waters of the Apalachicola Bay. This bay, one of the most productive and unique ecosystems in the country, once produced 10% of the nation’s oysters and 90% of Florida's. Today, only a handful of oystermen have work and this community struggles to maintain its tradition and livelihood. Oysters need a mix of freshwater and saltwater. They depend on this balance but the freshwater coming down the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Basin has been drastically cut short by a series of dams and overuse in Georgia and Alabama. As droughts persist alongside a constant pressure from a major metropolitan city at the headwaters, the Apalachicola Bay clings to a trickle of water. The project aims to connect users throughout the watershed and expose what's at the end of the river. It also aims to celebrate the bay and a lifestyle that revolves around the perfect mix of fresh and salt water.


Fracking: Forgotten on the Bakken


Photographer: Bruce Farnsworth

Forgotten on the Bakken illustrates the environmental and cultural impacts of fracking, an industry now underway in 20 states. This project begins on the northern great plains but is representative of experiences throughout fracking country. Traditions of open space and agrarian livelihoods have been disrupted by a flurry of activities associated with the high-volume hydraulic fracturing industry. North Dakota—situated on the Bakken geologic formation—is now the second highest oil-producing state in the nation.