Changing Perspectives

Energy in the American West

Photographer

Jamey Stillings

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Concept

Changing Perspectives is an aerial and ground based examination of large-scale renewable energy development in the American West with a long-term goal of expanding this work to a global study.

Renewable energy development will play an essential role in humankind's long-term survival and the ultimate viability of our global ecosystem. Utility-scale projects, those that add significant power to the electrical grid, manifest a positive shift away from a society dependent upon coal, petroleum, and nuclear power sources. Yet, such projects frequently raise challenging questions about land and resource use, wildlife protection, impact on local communities and respect for cultural sacred sites. This project seeks to foster a clearer understanding of large-scale renewable energy projects and be a constructive pro-active voice for responsible energy development.

Biography

Jamey Stillings' three-decade career spans documentary, fine art and commissioned projects. He has worked around the world for a diverse range of national and international clients.

Changing Perspectives continues Jamey's long-term exploration of human altered landscapes and began in October 2010, when he initiated an aerial survey of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California's Mojave Desert. The New York Times Magazine premiered the work as "A Bet on the Sun," in June 2012.

Recent acknowledgements: Recipient of the 2013 Eliot Porter Grant; Library of Congress acquisition -  Ivanpah Solar prints; Critical Mass 2013 Solo Show Award; International Photography Award, 1st Place, Editorial: Environmental, Professional 2013; Communication Arts Photography Annual 2013; Photolucida 2013, Critical Mass TOP 50; Prix Pictet 2013, Nominee.

www.jameystillingsprojects.com

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Water


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Initiated in 2011, “Water” is a fifteen-year photographic project. Water and humanity are moving towards a crisis. We live in a time when 650 million people have no access to safe drinking water; when our rivers, basins and lakes are affected by decades of industry; when rising sea levels are placing Pacific Islanders in the cross-hairs of becoming the first climate refugees. The complexity of our relationship with water reflects our greater behavior towards our environment, which we’re beginning to understand has a defining impact on our planet.


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Photographer: Dan Lamont and Sara Finkelstein

The facts are startling: the United States incarcerates more of its citizens than any other country on Earth. Those who fill the jails often come from fractured families with pernicious, multigenerational histories of poverty, substance abuse, mental illness, and domestic violence. Kids from such environments too often get in trouble. Incarcerated youth have a 75 percent chance of reoffending as adults and the cycle continues. It is a terrible tragedy and a colossal waste of human lives and social resources.