Shadows Of A Revolution


Paul Gregory Newman

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The fall of Nicolae Ceausescu took place in December of 1989 and the country slowly unraveled. Shadows of a Revolution began as a result of these events. The children of Romania had been abandoned by the State due to the collapse of the communist party and the social welfare system had all but been abolished instantaneously. Although many years had passed, the circumstances of the children had remained constant. The idea of these children being displaced due to economic hardship and forced to leave their families is an unbearable image for anyone to endure. Most children abandoned their families in the small villages they came from to make the dangerous migration to the capital city of Bucharest. Some of these children were placed into the sex trade while in transit, others as young as four years old hid secretly on trains with hope that the journey would bring them to the capital unharmed. Shadows of a Revolution is an ongoing 15 year exploration of the human condition that places hope on transition and growth for many of the youth of the streets. 


For over 20 years, photographer Paul Gregory Newman has sought to capture the human condition in times of social and economic transformation. His visual collection is built on travels spanning more than 18 countries, including first-hand accounts of children surviving on the streets of Romania after the fall of Ceau?escu, a telling portrait of the impact of population growth in northern Mexico, objective observations of the Bikers for Christ motorcycle outreach and the low-rider culture in Española, New Mexico. Transcending the diversity of these images is the consistent theme present across his entire body of work, a poignant view of the common conditions and experiences we share regardless of circumstance.

Exhibitions in the United States, Mexico, and the UK have expanded the reach of Mr. Newman’s work, inspiring a broad audience through compelling imagery, and promoting education, outreach, and change.

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Featured Projects

Mountain Caribou
A Visual Journey into the Imperiled World of an Endangered Species

Photographer: David Moskowitz

The alpine kingdom of mountain caribou in western Canada and the northwestern United States is crumbling around these beautiful and sensitive creatures. As their habitat has been steadily altered or destroyed by human activities, mountain caribou have been declining rapidly. Unsure whether this project will be documentation of the end of a distinct ecotype of caribou or a step towards inspiring the change in human behavior needed to save these animals, David Moskowitz set out to explore the world of these reclusive animals across the Selkirk, Columbia and Rocky mountains.

Ross Island and the Future of the McMurdo Sound Region

Photographer: Alasdair Turner

We have entered a time when places the least near us beckon us to understand them, to feel them so that while we tred on our part of the Earth they are constantly with us and with our choices. Ross Island and the McMurdo Sound Region and the science being conducted there embody what is left of our critical and fragile ecosystems and our attempts to understand them. They are not land for a nation but a place for the world. This project is intended to emotionally and scientifically engage citizens of every nation about why this place and the incredible science that is being conducted there matters. It will give life to and investigate the science of the region from the earliest expeditions to today’s ongoing research.

Between River and Sea

Photographer: Michael Hanson

Between River and Sea focuses on life in and around Apalachicola, FL. For over a century, an independent, hand-built industry has drifted through the shallow waters of the Apalachicola Bay. This bay, one of the most productive and unique ecosystems in the country, once produced 10% of the nation’s oysters and 90% of Florida's. Today, only a handful of oystermen have work and this community struggles to maintain its tradition and livelihood. Oysters need a mix of freshwater and saltwater. They depend on this balance but the freshwater coming down the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Basin has been drastically cut short by a series of dams and overuse in Georgia and Alabama. As droughts persist alongside a constant pressure from a major metropolitan city at the headwaters, the Apalachicola Bay clings to a trickle of water. The project aims to connect users throughout the watershed and expose what's at the end of the river. It also aims to celebrate the bay and a lifestyle that revolves around the perfect mix of fresh and salt water.

Fracking: Forgotten on the Bakken

Photographer: Bruce Farnsworth

Forgotten on the Bakken illustrates the environmental and cultural impacts of fracking, an industry now underway in 20 states. This project begins on the northern great plains but is representative of experiences throughout fracking country. Traditions of open space and agrarian livelihoods have been disrupted by a flurry of activities associated with the high-volume hydraulic fracturing industry. North Dakota—situated on the Bakken geologic formation—is now the second highest oil-producing state in the nation.